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Publications

This section provides recent references compiled from our bibliographic database addressing other drug use (such as GHB, ketamine, hallucinogens, betel nut, khat and steroids) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. To access our complete database please use our bibliography.

2014

Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs (2014)

Framework for a national response to new psychoactive substances.

Canberra: National Drug Strategy

2012

Lea T (2012)

Other drugs.

In: Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J, Conigrave K, eds. Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney: University of Sydney: 217-236

This chapter is from the Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work and provides information for alcohol and other drug (AOD) workers on other drugs, including:

  • kava
  • GHB
  • ketamine
  • hallucinogens (magic mushrooms and LSD)
  • other sedatives
  • betel nut (areca nut)
  • khat
  • steroids.

Abstract adapted from the University of Sydney

2011

Australian Crime Commission (2011)

Illicit drug data report 2009-10.

Canberra: Australian Crime Commission

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011)

2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

The 2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey was conducted between late-April and early-September 2010. This was the 10th survey in a series which began in 1985, and was the fifth to be managed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). More than 26,000 people aged 12 years or older participated in the survey, in which they were asked about their knowledge of and attitudes towards drugs, their drug consumption histories, and related behaviours. Most of the analysis presented is of people aged 14 years or older, so that results can be compared with previous reports.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare abstract

Ness A, Payne J (2011)

Patterns of mephedrone, GHB, Ketamine and Rohypnol use among police detainees: findings from the DUMA program.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology

This report presents the results of data collected from a sample of 824 police detainees in a study that examined the prevalence of four separate drug types that are not included in a regular questionnaire in this research area. They are:

  • mephedrone
  • rohypnol
  • GHB
  • Kketamine

The study is the first to use a large sample of Australian police detainees to investigate both the knowledge and prevalence of use for newly emerging and less commonly used drugs such as mephedrone, GHB, Ketamine and Rohypnol. While the findings indicate a relatively low level of use, there nevertheless remains a need for ongoing assessment to identify changing trends and patterns of use that can be responded to accordingly.

The resource is not Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific, although detainees would have included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, statistically, due to over representation in the criminal justice system.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Rodas A, Bode A, Dolan K (2011)

Supply, demand and harm reduction strategies in Australian prisons: an update.

Canberra: National Drug and Alcohol Centre, University of New South Wales

Stafford J, Burns L (2011)

Australian drug trends 2010: findings from the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS).

: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales

Taplin S, Mattick RP (2011)

Child protection and mothers in substance abuse treatment.

Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

 
Last updated: 5 October 2017
 
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