Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+ Share by Email

Skip to content

Key resources

  • Bibliography
    Bibliography
  • Health promotion
    Health promotion
  • Health practice
    Health practice
  • Yarning places
    Yarning places
  • Programs
    Programs
  • Organisations
    Organisations
  • Conferences
    Conferences
  • Courses
    Courses
  • Funding
    Funding
  • Glossary
    Glossary
 
Print this page Print

Regulation and control

2017

Australian Department of Social Services (2017)

Cashless debit card trial evaluation: final evaluation report.

: Australian Department of Social Services

This report presents the finding of an independent evaluation of the Cashless Debit Card Trial (CDCT) in Ceduna region of South Australia, and the East Kimberley region of Western Australia.

The CDCT aims to reduce the levels of harm associated with alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, and gambling. The trial has been led by the Department of Social Services (DSS) with support from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) and the Department of Human Services. The trial was developed in close consultation with local community leaders, local and state government agencies and other Australian Government agencies.

ORIMA Research was commissioned by the DSS to independently evaluate the trial in both locations.

Findings from the evaluation include:

  • a reduction in the consumption of alcohol and other drugs
  • a reduction in gambling
  • with the exception of driving offences and apprehensions under the Public Intoxication Act in Ceduna, crime statistics showed no improvement since the commencement of the trial
    • however, qualitative research noted that community leaders and stakeholders found an observable reduction in crime
  • there is some evidence of a reduction of harm related to alcohol and other drugs in the trial sites
  • there was no statistically significant reduction in CDCT participant and non-participant perceptions of safety
  • some trial participants who spent their money appropriately felt as though they were being penalised or discriminated against by being forced to participate in the CDCT
  • there were some issues related to complications/limitations experienced by some when using cashless debit cards.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Bielefeld S (2017)

Cashless welfare cards: controlling spending patterns to what end?.

Indigenous Law Bulletin; 8(29): 28-32

Clough AR, Margolis SA, Miller A, Shakeshaft A, Doran CM, McDermott R, Sanson-Fisher R, Ypinazar V, Martin D, Robertson JA, Fitts MS, Bird K, Honorato B, Towle S, West C (2017)

Alcohol management plans in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australian communities in Queensland: community residents have experienced favourable impacts but also suffered unfavourable ones.

BMC Public Health; 17: 55

Retrieved 10 January 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-3995-8

Fitts MS, Robertson J, Towle S, Doran CM, McDermott R, Miller A, Margolis S, Ypinazar V, Clough AR (2017)

'Sly grog' and 'homebrew': a qualitative examination of illicit alcohol and some of its impacts on Indigenous communities with alcohol restrictions in regional and remote Queensland (Australia).

BMC Research Notes; 10: 360

Retrieved 1 August 2017 from https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-2691-9

Klein E, Razi E (2017)

The Cashless Debit Card trial in the East Kimberley.

Canberra: Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

Langton M, Smith K (2017)

A regional approach to Alcohol Management in Northern Australia: mobility, supply chains and community control.

: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

Midford R, McKenzie J, Mayhead R (2017)

Not your typical alcohol accord: the long-term impact of a voluntary liquor agreement in a small Australian town.

Substance Use & Misuse; Latest articles(http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2017.1281312):

Muhunthan J, Angell B, Hackett ML, Wilson A, Latimer J, Eades AM, Jan S (2017)

Global systematic review of Indigenous community-led legal interventions to control alcohol.

BMJ Open; 7(3): 1-14

Retrieved 27 March 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013932

Northern Territory Department of Health (2017)

Alcohol policies and legislation review in the Northern Territory.

Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Health

Northern Territory Government (2017)

Alcohol policies and legislation review: final report.

Darwin: Northern Territory Government

This report was produced as part of an independent review of the Northern Territory's (NT) current alcohol policies and legislation. It was commissioned in response to concern about levels of alcohol consumption and alcohol related harm in the NT.

The overarching objective of the review is to provide recommendations to the NT Government on evidence-based best practice alcohol harm prevention and management initiatives. It also provides a rigorous and contemporary regulatory framework to support the NT Government to develop a whole-of-government integrated alcohol harm reduction framework.

The review will assist with developing an integrated Alcohol harm reduction strategy and will form an important part of the NT Government's efforts to prevent and reduce the harms associated with alcohol misuse.

Some key recommendations from the review include:

  • additional capture and sharing of data about alcohol use, treatment and prevention
  • re-writing of the Liqour act
  • no changes to be made to the dry status of an area/community without local decision making and local ownership over alcohol management
  • establishment of a minimum floor price for all alcohol products
  • coordination of more effective collaboration between police, sobering up shelters, community patrols and local government to ensure a coordinated approach to tackling alcohol related problems
  • the NT Government prioritise funding for early intervention services for Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), including paediatric diagnosis, psychotherapy and other behavioural management measures, and early childhood support and education services
  • establishment of an alcohol and other drugs court, with an emphasis on diversion and treatment
  • a review of sobering up shelters across the NT be undertaken.

Abstract adapted from the Northern Territory Government

ORIMA Research (2017)

Evaluation of the cashless debit card trial - initial conditions report.

Melbourne: Australian Department of Social Services

PricewaterhouseCoopers Indigenous Consulting (2017)

Evaluation of the Alcohol Mandatory Treatment program.

Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Health

This report was produced as a result of the evaluation into the Alcohol Mandatory Treatment (AMT) program. The AMT program is a tailored alcohol treatment plan for people in the Northern Territory who are taken into police protective custody for being intoxicated in public three or more times over a two month period.

The aim of the evaluation was to:

  • assess the extent to which the aims of the AMT Act have been met
  • consider the cost effectiveness of AMT and describe the way that AMT has been implemented and engaged with
  • explore any unintended consequences resulting from AMT.

A number of recommendations were suggested as part of the evaluation.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Robertson JA, Fitts MS, Clough AR (2017)

Unintended impacts of alcohol restrictions on alcohol and other drug use in Indigenous communities in Queensland (Australia).

International Journal of Drug Policy; 41: 34-40

Room R (2017)

The case for government-run liquor stores in the Australian Northern Territory: Looking outside the box in regulating the supply of alcohol.

Drug and Alcohol Review; 36(5): 575-577

Smith K (2017)

The cashless debit card trial: a public health, rights-based approach to better health and social outcomes.

Indigenous Law Bulletin; 8(29): 22-27

West C, Muller R, Clough AR (2017)

Injuries and alcohol management plans in remote Indigenous communities: a two-community comparison.

Injury Prevention; Online First(http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042151)

Retrieved 23 August 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042151

2016

Bird K, Fitts MS, Clough AR (2016)

Alcohol management plans in Indigenous communities in Queensland (Australia) may have unintended implications for the care of children.

Health & Justice; 4: 8

Retrieved 18 July 2016 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40352-016-0039-5

Clough AR, Margolis SA, Miller A, Shakeshaft A, Doran CM, Mcdermott R, Sanson-Fisher R, Towle S, Martin D, Ypinazar V, Robertson JA, Fitts MS, Bird K, Honorato B, West C (2016)

Alcohol control policies in Indigenous communities: a qualitative study of the perceptions of their effectiveness among service providers, stakeholders and community leaders in Queensland (Australia).

International Journal of Drug Policy; 36: 67-75

Lovell ME (2016)

The normalisation of income management in Australia: analysis of the parliamentary debates of 2007 and 2009-10.

Australian Journal of Social Issues; 51(4): 433-448

Midford R, McKenzie J, Mayhead R (2016)

'It fits the needs of the community': long-term evaluation of the Norseman Voluntary Liquor Agreement.

Darwin: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

In the early 2000s, members of the Aboriginal community in Norseman, in Western Australia (WA) became concerned about heavy alcohol use within the community. From the idea that specific alcoholic beverages were associated with heavy drinking, a proposed restriction on the sale of such beverages was outlined by the Aboriginal community. The following actions resulted:

  • a restrictive alcohol agreement was implemented in 2008
  • the impact of the restriction was evaluated in 2009
  • the restriction was found to be successful
  • the restriction was extended.

This report builds on the original evaluation, to assess whether the agreement has been able to maintain its initial benefits. The key finding was that alcohol restrictions can have a long-term positive benefit when initiated and supported by the community. One recommendation handed down in this report is that the Norseman community should be encouraged and supported to revisit their restrictive practices in the sale of fortified and non-fortified wines. Further, that a restriction on the sale of spirits should also be considered. The report was written for health workers and policy makers through the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE).

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Northern Territory Department of Business (2016)

Alice Springs Alcohol Management Plan 2016-2018.

Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Business

Usher K, Woods C, Lynch P, Pointing SB, Budden L, Barker R, Catchpoole J, Clough A (2016)

Is population flow an unintended consequence of alcohol management plans?.

Journal of Clinical Nursing; Accepted articles(http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13534):

2015

Boffa J, Gray D, Ah Chee D (2015)

Aboriginal communities, alcohol-related harms and the need for an evidence-based approach.

Drug and Alcohol Review; Early view(http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12296):

Brady M (2015)

Failing to ‘carry the people along’.

Drug and Alcohol Review; Early View(http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12298): 1-2

Clough AR, Bird K (2015)

The implementation and development of complex alcohol control policies in Indigenous communities in Queensland (Australia).

International Journal of Drug Policy; 26(4): 345–351

d'Abbs P (2015)

Widening the gap: the gulf between policy rhetoric and implementation reality in addressing alcohol problems among Indigenous Australians.

Drug and Alcohol Review; Early view(http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12299):

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs (2015)

Alcohol, hurting people and harming communities: Inquiry into the harmful use of alcohol in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Canberra: Parliament of Australia

This publication reports on an inquiry conducted by the Australian Government into the harmful use of alcohol in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The terms of reference for the inquiry included:

  • patterns of supply of, and demand for alcohol in different Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, age groups and genders
  • the social and economic determinants of harmful alcohol use across Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  • trends and prevalence of alcohol related harm, including alcohol-fuelled violence and impacts on newborns e.g. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)
  • the implications of FAS and FASD being declared disabilities
  • best practice treatments and support for minimising alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm
  • best practice strategies to minimise alcohol misuse and alcohol-related harm
  • best practice identification to include international and domestic comparisons.

The report outlines a number of recommendations to address the harmful use of alcohol in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Abstract adapted from House of Representatives Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs

Lander F, Gray D, Wilkes E (2015)

The Alcohol Mandatory Treatment Act: evidence, ethics and the law.

Medical Journal of Australia; 203(1): 47-49

Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships (2015)

Alcohol Management Plan.

Retrieved 2015 from https://www.datsip.qld.gov.au/publications-governance-resources/policy-governance/alcohol-management-plan

Alcohol management plans (AMPs) currently operate in 19 discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across 15 Local Government Areas in Queensland and were introduced to reduce alcohol related violence, particularly against women and children.

These plans are under review and will consider:

  • the evidence base regarding alcohol misuse and the causes of high levels of violence
  • strength of community leadership and capacity to manage alcohol misuse and reduce alcohol-related harm
  • effectiveness and impacts of current AMP supply and demand strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm
  • impact of AMPs on community members and regional centres
  • future strategies to manage alcohol misuse and reduce alcohol-related harm.

Abstract adapted from Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships

Shaw G, Brady M, d’Abbs P (2015)

Managing alcohol consumption: a review on licensed clubs in remote Indigenous communities in the NT.

Canberra: Bowchung

Western Australian Drug and Alcohol Office (2015)

The impact of liquor restrictions in Halls Creek: quantitative data five years post-restriction.

Perth: Western Australian Drug and Alcohol Office

Wilkes E (2015)

Aboriginal autonomy and the reduction of alcohol-related harm.

Drug and Alcohol Review; Early view(http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12297):

2014

Australian National Council on Drugs (2014)

Mandatory treatment: position paper.

Canberra: Australian National Council on Drugs

Brady M (2014)

Law reforming lawyers and Aboriginal social controls: the case of the Western Australian Aboriginal communities act.

Australian Indigenous Law Review; 17(1): 38-46

Brady M (2014)

Lessons from a history of beer canteens and licensed clubs in Indigenous Australian communities.

Canberra: Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

This discussion paper aims to provide some historical depth to the latest resurgence of interest in the idea that alcoholic drinks should be made available in licensed canteens or clubs in discrete Aboriginal communities.

The paper traces the social and policy changes that created a context within which it was thought that rationed sales of alcohol in home communities would encourage responsible drinking practices among Indigenous drinkers.

Such experiments followed closely on the repeal of Aboriginal prohibition in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland.

The paper also discusses what went wrong with these establishments and makes suggestions for the future.

Abstract adapted from Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

Buckley T (2014)

A criminal shift: alcohol regulation in the Northern Territory.

Indigenous Law Bulletin; 8(12): 20-23

Clough AR, Fitts MS, Robertson J, Shakeshaft A, Miller A, Doran CM, Muller R, Ypinazar V, Martin D, McDermott R, Sanson-Fisher R, Towle S, Margolis SA, West C (2014)

Study protocol - alcohol management plans (AMPs) in remote Indigenous communities in Queensland: their impacts on injury, violence, health and social indicators and their cost-effectiveness.

BMC Public Health; 14: 15

Retrieved 9 January 2014 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-15

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (2014)

Alcohol management plan: Tapatjatjaka Wangka Kantilya Kanyintjaku Titjikala Strong Voices.

Canberra: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (2014)

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory: six-monthly progress report 1 January 2013 to 30 June 2013.

Canberra: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

Donnelly N, Menéndez P, Mahoney N (2014)

The effect of liquor licence concentrations in local areas on rates of assault in New South Wales.

Crime and Justice Bulletin; 2014(181): 1-16

2013

Aboriginal Peak Organisations of the Northern Territory (2013)

Not under the influence of evidence: a sober critique of the NT Alcohol Mandatory Treatment Bill: APO NT Submission on the NT Alcohol Mandatory Treatment Bill.

Canberra: National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation

Anthony T, Blagg H (2013)

STOP in the name of who's law? Driving and the regulation of contested space in Central Australia.

Social & Legal Studies; 22(1): 43-66

Australian National Council on Drugs (2013)

Alcohol action plan: issues paper.

Canberra: Australian National Council on Drugs

Closing the Gap Clearinghouse (2013)

Diverting Indigenous offenders from the criminal justice system.

Canberra: Closing the Gap Clearinghouse

Cussen T, Payne J, Marks D (2013)

Policing alcohol and illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in metropolitan environments.

Canberra: National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund

Department of Families Housing Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (2013)

Closing the gap in the Northern Territory monitoring report: January to June 2012.

Canberra: Australian Government

Johnston L, Doyle J, Morgan B, Atkinson-Briggs S, Firebrace B, Marika M, Reilly R, Cargo M, Riley T, Rowley K (2013)

A review of programs that targeted environmental determinants of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health; 10(8): 3518-3542

New South Wales Parliament General Purpose Standing Committee No 2 (2013)

Drug and alcohol treatment.

Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales

Northern Territory Government (2013)

Alcohol measures in the NT.

Retrieved 2013 from http://www.dob.nt.gov.au/gambling-licensing/liquor/liquor-restrictions/alcohol-measures/Pages/default.aspx

This website provides information on the different types of liquor restrictions in force across the Northern Territory (NT). Different maps of regions in NT provide a snapshot of alcohol restrictions in specific areas.

Information is also provided on:

  • liquor restricted areas
  • photo identification system
  • offences under the liquor act.

Abstract adapted from Northern Territory Government

Alcohol protection orders (2013)

Northern Territory Police

This factsheet provides information for people in the Northern Territory about how an alcohol protection order (APO) can be issued, and what an APO prevents a person from doing.

It also includes information about penalties for breaking the condition of an APO and other frequently asked questions.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Reconciliation Australia (2013)

Reconciliation Australia: Psychological Perspectives. Part 3 (of 6) Professor Marcia Langton.

: CASSEvideos

Professor Marcia Langton discusses the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the impact of alcohol abuse, the role of customary laws and the failures of the justice system.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Smith K, Langton M, d’Abbs P, Room R, Chenhall R, Brown A (2013)

Alcohol management plans and related alcohol reforms.

Sydney: Indigenous justice clearinghouse

2012

Bray JR, Gray M, Hand K, Bradbury B, Eastman C, Katz I (2012)

Evaluating new income management in the Northern Territory: first evaluation report.

: Social Policy Research Centre Australian National University Australian Institute of Family Studies

Carragher N, Chalmers J (2012)

What are the options? Pricing and taxation policy reforms to redress excessive alcohol consumption and related harms in Australia.

Sydney: NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research

Clough AR, Jacups S, Robertson J, Rogerson B, Graham V (2012)

Listening to what Indigenous people in remote communities say about alcohol restrictions and cannabis use: “Good thing that the alcohol's gone, but the gunja has kept going” [letter].

Medical Journal of Australia; 197(5):

d'Abbs P (2012)

Problematizing alcohol through the eyes of the other: alcohol policy and Aboriginal drinking in the Northern Territory, Australia.

Contemporary Drug Problems; 39(3): 371-396

Drug and Alcohol Office WA (2012)

The impact of liquor restrictions in Kununurra and Wyndham: a twelve month review.

Perth: Drug and Alcohol Office WA

Drug and Alcohol Office WA (2012)

The impact of liquor restrictions in Kununurra and Wyndham: Six month review.

Perth: Drug and Alcohol Office WA

Gray D (2012)

Community-wide approaches to substance misuse.

In: Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J, Conigrave K, eds. Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney: University of Sydney: 331-342

This chapter is from the Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work and provides information for alcohol and other drug (AOD) workers on community-wide approaches to substance misuse, including:

  • engaging with communities to address drug and alcohol issues
  • what communities can do to prevent or limit drinking problems.

Abstract adapted from the University of Sydney

Gray D (2012)

Is the demand for alcohol in Indigenous Australian communities ‘price inelastic'?.

Drug and Alcohol Review; 31(6): 818–822

John Scougall Consulting Services (2012)

Keeping people safe: an evaluation of the Nyoongar Patrol Outreach Service.

Perth: Australian Policy Online

Kirby T (2012)

Blunting the legacy of alcohol abuse in Western Australia.

The Lancet; 379(9812): 207-208

Northern Territory Government (2012)

Enough is enough: alcohol reform report July 2011 to December 2011.

Darwin: Northern Territory Government

Northern Territory Government (2012)

Enough is enough: alcohol reform report July 2011 to end March 2012.

Darwin: Northern Territory Government

Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services (2012)

Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services report: June 2011 to August 2012.

Darwin: Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services

This is the first of two annual reports that examine the objectives, strategies and funding arrangements of agreements that form the basis of the partnership between the Commonwealth and Northern Territory (NT) governments aimed at closing the gap in living conditions and social outcomes for Aboriginal Territorians.

The geographies assessed in the report include; Territory growth towns, Community living areas, town camps, homelands, communities and outstations.

The report focuses on four major themes arising from the approach taken by governments in relation to Aboriginal people since the NT emergency response (NTER) commenced in 2007 and reflected in the Stronger futures arrangements proposed for the next ten years. These are:

  • transparency and accountability
  • the balance between the crisis and developmental aspects of initiatives under both the NTER and Stronger futures
  • the marginalisation of Aboriginal people in decision making and resource allocation
  • the lack of long-term planning and capacity development within Aboriginal towns, particularly the transfer of service delivery from Aboriginal organisations to the non-Indigenous, non-profit sector.
The report makes twelve recommendations in the following areas:population and mobility; one-stop shop business centres; accountability and transparency; prioritisation of investments; community safety; early childhood; education; youth services review; labour force participation; workforce development (housing); housing; and health (morgues).

Abstract adapted from Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services report

Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs (2012)

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory Bill 2011 and two related bills.

Canberra: Parliament of Australia

Senior k, William I, Chenhall R, Cunningham T, Nagel T, Loyd R, McMahon R (2012)

Developing successful diversionary schemes for youth from remote Aboriginal communities.

Canberra: Criminology Research Advisory Council

Symons M, Gray D, Chikritzhs T, Skov S, Saggers S, Boffa J, Low J (2012)

A longitudinal study of influences on alcohol consumption and related harm in Central Australia: with a particular emphasis on the role of price.

Perth, WA: National Drug Research Institute

This report outlines the findings of a study undertaken by the National Drug Research Institute in collaboration with the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress. The study examined the impact of various alcohol control measures on levels of alcohol consumption and related harm in Central Australia for the period 2000-2010. This report includes details on:

  • study aim and research methods
  • alcohol control measures
  • alcohol consumption
  • alcoholic beverage prices
  • health indicators
  • crime and public order.

The study found that imposing additional alcohol control measures has contributed significantly to the reduction of estimated per capita consumption in Central Australia. The study found that most effective measures have been those which indirectly increased the average price per litre of alcoholic beverages.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Walker E (2012)

Stronger futures alcohol regulation in the NT.

Indigenous Law Bulletin; 8(3): 20-23

Pilbara liquor restrictions (2012)

Western Australian Department of Racing Gaming and Liquor

These factsheets contain information on liquor restrictions in the Pilbara region of Western Australia (WA). The factsheets detail liquor restrictions, effective as at 8 October 2012, in the following Pilbara towns:

  • Dampier
  • Karratha
  • Kumarina
  • Marble Bar
  • Mardie
  • Newman
  • Nullagine
  • Onslow
  • Pannawonica
  • Paraburdoo
  • Pardoo
  • Point Samson
  • Port Hedland and South Hedland
  • Sandfire Roadhouse
  • Tom Price
  • Whim Creek
  • Wickham.
The restrictions were imposed by the Department of Racing, Gaming and Liquor WA, under section 64 of the Liquor Control Act 1988, in response to two reports submitted to the Director by WA Police and the West Pilbara Alcohol Management Group.

Abstract adapted from Department of Racing, Gaming and Liquor WA

2011

Breen C, Shakeshaft A, Slade T, Love S, D'Este C, Mattick RP (2011)

Do community characteristics predict alcohol-related crime?.

Alcohol and Alcoholism; 46(4): 464-470

Catto M (2011)

Alcohol use among Indigenous peoples: the harmful use of alcohol amongst Indigenous Australians.

The Chronicle; 20(1): 21

Crundall I (2011)

Alcohol management in Kakadu.

The Chronicle; 20(1): 13-14

d'Abbs PHN (2011)

Alcohol restrictions in Indigenous communities: necessary but not sufficient.

Medical Journal of Australia; 194(10): 507

Dingwall KM, Maruff P, Cairney S (2011)

Neuropsychological problems and alcohol availability appear to be key factors in continued heavy alcohol use by Aboriginal Australians.

Medical Journal of Australia; 194(1): 50-51

Duncan B (2011)

Restrictions reap rewards.

Of Substance; 9(3): 18-21

Education and Health Standing Committee (2011)

Alcohol restrictions in the Kimberley: a 'window of opportunity' for improved health, education, housing and employment.

Perth, WA: Parliament of Western Australia

Government of Western Australia Drug and Alcohol Office (2011)

The impact of liquor restrictions in Halls Creek: quantitative data 24 month review.

Perth, WA: Drug and Alcohol Office

Gray DA, Wilkes ET (2011)

Alcohol restrictions in Indigenous communities: an effective strategy if Indigenous-led.

Medical Journal of Australia; 194(10): 508

Harris M (2011)

Opinion: NTER evaluation 2011.

Melbourne: Concerned Australians

Hudson S (2011)

Alcohol restrictions in Indigenous communities and frontier towns.

St Leonards, NSW: Centre for Independent Studies

Margolis SA, Ypinazar VA, Muller R, Clough A (2011)

Increasing alcohol restrictions and rates of serious injury in four remote Australian Indigenous communities.

Medical Journal of Australia; 194(10): 503-506

Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services (2011)

Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services report #4 December 2010 to May 2011.

Darwin: Northern Territory Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services

Northern Territory Government (2011)

Enough is enough: alcohol reform report 20 October 2011.

Darwin: Northern Territory Government

Putt J (2011)

Review of the Substance Abuse Intelligence Desks and Dog Operations Units.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Queensland Government (2011)

Mid-year update on key indicators for Queensland's discrete Indigenous communities: incorporating the October – December 2010 quarter.

Brisbane: Queensland Government

Queensland Health (2011)

2011–2012 Queensland drug action plan.

Brisbane: Queensland Health

The 2011-2012 Queensland drug action plan builds on the longstanding partnerships between health, law enforcement and education sectors, to engage government, non-government organisations and the community in reducing the supply, the demand and the harms associated with drug misuse throughout Queensland.

It focuses on five priority areas:

  • alcohol-related violence and injury
  • smoking and heavy drinking
  • reducing harms for families
  • tobacco, alcohol and cannabis use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • pharmaceutical and illicit drugs.

Queensland Health abstract

Tobin CL, Moodie R, Livingstone C (2011)

A review of public opinion towards alcohol controls in Australia.

BMC Public Health; 11: 58

Retrieved 27 January 2011 from http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2458-11-58.pdf

Wenbin L, Chikritzhs T (2011)

Revealing the link between licensed outlets and violence: Counting venues versus measuring alcohol availability.

Drug and Alcohol Review; 30(5): 524-535

 
Last updated: 13 December 2017
 
Return to top
spacing
general box

Contribute

Share your information » Give us feedback »
spacing
 
spacing
 


Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute