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New $400,000 grant to fill a Valley mental health 'vacuum'

Date posted: 22 August 2017

Mental health services in the Clarence Valley, New South Wales, have been funded $400,000 to provide youth case management services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Federal Member for Page, Kevin Hogan, has announced the funding for Aboriginal group Gurehlgam Corporation over the next two years.

'We're getting headspace, we've got the Buttery bringing early intervention services here and now we're filling the vacuum in the Aboriginal youth space,' the Member said.

'It is important that the types of services are provided for all of our community, particularly the most disadvantaged. There are far too many examples where people have not had access to these services across the Clarence,' he added.

Gurehlgam Chairperson, Julie Perkins, said that Gurehlgam's Indigenous Youth and Families program had been a key part of the provision of mental health services to young Aboriginal people in the Clarence Valley.

'Gurehlgam is doing great work here. We're trying to create a hub for Aboriginal services and being able to provide these services,' said Ms Perkins.

The latest grant comes from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet's Indigenous advancement strategy (IAS). Mr Hogan said that the grant to Gurehlgam is one onf 43 recently funded under the IAS.

The services fund provide intensive support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affect by drugs, alcohol, domestic violence, mental health and well being and youth offending.

Source: The Daily Examiner

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Last updated: 22 August 2017
 
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