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Northern Territory: Too much grog, too much harm

Date posted: 16 August 2016

Alcohol is responsible for two deaths, 52 hospitalisations and 69 assaults every week in the Northern Territory (NT). The People’s Alcohol Action Coalition (PAAC), based in Alice Springs, and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) are working to demonstrate the extent of alcohol-related harm in the NT and have put forward a comprehensive plan of action.

PAAC spokesperson Dr John Boffa says those consumption patterns are reflected in the high level of preventable alcohol-related illness, injury, and death.

'Unfortunately the Northern Territory is the booziest jurisdiction in Australia and, as a direct result, we have the highest proportion of alcohol-attributable deaths and hospitalisations. These statistics are damning. Our drivers are 20 times more likely to return a breath test above the legal limit; alcohol’s a factor in at least 42 per cent of road deaths. It’s a factor in 53 per cent of all assaults, and in up to 65 per cent of all family violence reported to police', said Dr Boffa.

PAAC and FARE have called for greater investment in treatment services, a reduction in the number of liquor outlets, increased community involvement in liquor licence regulation, and a greater investment in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Source: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE)

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Last updated: 16 August 2016
 
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Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute